Slaying it

It was the shining moment. I was awesome. No one would dispute it. In it to win it, on top of my game and running with the big dogs, baby. I knew what Michael Jordan felt like.

That’s this week’s Field of Steve Podcast.

This week’s music is from Alisa Miranova. You can hear the whole album here.

If you have story ideas for the podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr (at) gmail dot com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little “tip jar” button here can help. It will direct you to PayPal, where you can contribute using your own PayPal account or with a credit card.

Thanks for listening.

SPJ – Award for the Day Job

Me and Diana at the Safeco Field SPJ awards ceremony.

A piece I wrote last year, Tim Sheldon Makes No Apologies for Dual Roles, won third place in the “Government and Politics” category for the Society of Professional Journalists Region 10 for 2010. The area covers Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska and Montana. The event Saturday night was at Safeco Field, which kind of a cool idea.

The story discussed Tim Sheldon’s role as a state senator and county commissioner. I went to a county meeting he attended in Shelton in the morning, traveled to Olympia with him for a lunchtime event at the state capitol, then traveled back to Shelton.

Thanks go to Kim Rubenstein and Vince Dice for their editing, and I think the story itself was Kim’s idea. This was a fun story and video to work on. And it was certainly a story worth telling.

Five colleagues at the Kitsap Sun were also awarded.

Rachel Pritchett won first place in the Investigative Reporting category for her informative and troubling series on nursing home problems, “Cautionary Tales in the Complaint Files.” The series was quite good, and I must say winning in the investigative category is quite the plum in our business.

Jeff Graham, a sports writer, won first place in the Business Reporting category for his series on “The Business of Golf,” another victim of the recession.

Tristan Baurick won first place in the Personalities Reporting category for his amazing profile “The Anchor of Eagle Harbor.” This is the story of a guy who is a liveaboard in Bainbridge Island’s Eagle Harbor. Tristan was not only able to get details few could, he described them beautifully. When I read the story I thought it was quite possibly the best written piece I had ever read in the Kitsap Sun, ever.

Chris Henry wrote a sweet piece on a couple celebrating 75 years of marriage, “Reaching 75th Wedding Anniversary Took ‘Hard Work and Luck,'” and won first place in the Short Feature category.

Nathan Joyce won third place in Sports Column category for his piece that discusses the realities of being a high school coach these days, “It’s Not Getting Any Easier Out There for a Coach.”

I work with a solid group of writers and editors. Even better, they’re good people. The Kitsap Sun is a fun place to work, a great place to do what I love.

Civil Disobedience: I sent a message to 1969

A statue outside Milan's stock exchange, surely inspired by true events in my life.

Walking on a sidewalk leading to home, two boys carry out a plan to send a message, one that would repeat itself in later years.

This is now the Field of Steve Podcast. I made the name change official.

This week’s program shows looks at the greater message in a greeting we all know but don’t often see, at least I hope we don’t.

That’s this week’s Field of Steve Podcast.

To hear the Dead in 30 Days song “80 Pills” go to archive.org.

You can listen to Chriss Onac’s album “Saines Pensées” at Jamendo.com

If you have story ideas for the podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr (at) gmail dot com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little “tip jar” button here can help. It will direct you to PayPal, where you can contribute using your own PayPal account or with a credit card.

Thanks for listening.

Chad stays Chad and I stay Steve

Part 2 of “My friends call me Steve but you can call me John” revisits my friend Chad’s unlikely name change when he was probably less than one day old and the impact that change did or did not have on him.

We also discuss some of the conclusions on naming from the book “Freakonomics.”

In the end I make peace with my own name.

To hear the Löhstana album Experimental 2, click here.

If you have story ideas for the podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr (at) gmail dot com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little “tip jar” button here can help. It will direct you to PayPal, where you can contribute using your own PayPal account or with a credit card.

Thanks for listening.

My friends call me Steve but you can call me John, Part 1

A friend had his named changed in an unlikely way. His original name went to someone else, since his family was no longer going to use it. The two whose names were affected ended up in opposite ends of the same industry.

This week’s Narrative Arts podcast is the first of two parts that deal with the impact of what we call ourselves. Chances are whatever differences we experience are minor, but the possibilities are worth exploring.

This podcast, “My friends call me Steve but you can call me John, Part 1,” is about 11 minutes long.

To hear the Löhstana album Experimental 2, click here.

If you have story ideas for the Narrative Arts podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr (at) gmail dot com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little PayPal button that follows will help. Consider it the tip jar. I’d label it “tip jar” if I could figure out how.

Hey look. I figured it out!

This week’s podcast: What if Chad had stayed Eric?

This week on the Narrative Arts Podcast we will air Part 1 of a two-part conversation exploring how life might be different based on a decision most people have little to no control over. We’ll meet a Chad, who once was an Eric, and we’ll discover the fate of the guy who became Eric instead.

We’ll also consider the impact made by an all-American hero.

Look for the podcast Saturday.