Buying wholesale from the rumor mill – Part 1

It was so much fun to take a few moments from the back-breaking task that is my day job and discuss the latest happenings of Anthony Weiner and Charlie Sheen with my workmates while those separate scandals were taking place, despite one of my boss’s contentions that he doesn’t care.

He raises a fair point, though, one that deserves answering. It’s the question of why we care about celebrities and get so excited about it when they mess up. I won’t say I’m as guilty as anyone, because, c’mon, I do have a life. Sometimes I’m slow to the dance but once I’m in I’m there for real, baby!

This week’s Field of Steve podcast is the first of two parts. Next week’s podcast will give you an example of what it’s like to be on the other end of a well publicized scandal of sorts. First, though, listen to the many voices who will help contribute to answering the question of why we care when celebrities are naughty.

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This week’s podcast is brought to you thanks to the support of a listener, one who would like you to visit the blog called COPD and Other Stuff. The site deals with COPD, which is Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The two main forms of those are emphysema and chronic asthmatic bronchitis. The other stuff on the blog includes Arthritis, Cellulites, Sarcoidosis, Sleep Apnea, RLS, Psoriasis and support groups and caregivers, and whatever else strikes the author’s fancy.

Sponsorships for individual episodes of The Field of Steve podcast are available through June for $25. We will tailor the announcement to your liking. Contact me by e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com, or just click on the tip jar at the bottom and make sure to leave your e-mail with your donation so I can contact you.

Feel free, of course, to contribute however much you want by clicking on the tip jar. That will take you to PayPal, where you can use your own account or a credit card to donate to this work.

The music from this episode is by Talco and the Tunguska Electronic Music Society

If you have story ideas for the podcast, e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com.

Thanks for listening. Part 2 will be at you on July 4. No better way to celebrate our nation’s independence, I say, than listening to the Field of Steve podcast. It will make you grateful you’re an American, unless you’re not an American, in which case you’ll be grateful to be whatever nationality you are, because where you live you are free to listen to the Field of Steve podcast. Frankly, it should be one of those inalienable rights everyone gets so excited about.

C’mon dummy. Subcribe!

That little thing on the right that says “EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION” isn’t there just to be pretty. It’s there to make sure you have something in your email box each week. Not only that, it will be from me! You can be notified any time a new episode of the Field of Steve podcast is posted. And sometimes I’ll write things about other things that cause us to do and think things.

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Clarence Clemons: a storyteller in his own right

As the new year began in 1981 I grew entranced by a storyteller whose supporting cast I would later learn was more than just support.

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band have been more than musicians, and Clarence Clemons, who died Saturday, was a key player serving a role I didn’t quite get until I saw the band live 19 years after I became a fan.

Clarence’s stories were not spoken on Springsteen records, but the soulful saxophone he provided told stories during lyrical silence.

This week’s podcast is about the storytelling of Bruce and Clarence and how both were influential to me.

We have a sponsor for next week’s podcast. I decided to do this week’s with no sponsor.

Sponsorships for individual episodes of The Field of Steve podcast are available through June for $25. We will tailor the announcement to your liking. Contact me by e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com, or just click on the tip jar at the bottom and make sure to leave your e-mail with your donation so I can contact you.

Feel free, of course, to contribute however much you want by clicking on the tip jar. That will take you to PayPal, where you can use your own account or a credit card to donate to this work.

The music from this episode is all by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. I’m sure you’ll have no problem finding his music.

If you have story ideas for the podcast, e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com.

Thanks for listening. And thanks for your patience this week. Look for the next episode on Monday morning.

About that podcast . . .

This weekend was good, and it was chaotic. I’ve made a couple of changes to the podcast. They are relatively minor.

First, I am delaying by a week the podcast dealing with celebrity meltdowns. The chief reason for that is the death of Clarence Clemons, saxophonist for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. This evening I will be crafting a kind of tribute to Clemons. Anyone who knows well knows Springsteen has been my favorite artist for years. We’re up to 30 years now. I didn’t start out that way either, but I became a fan about 12 years before I saw him perform live and about 18 years before I saw him with the E Street Band. That makes me kind of a rarity. Clarence was, in my view, the most critical member of the E Street Band and integral to Springsteen’s storytelling.

The second piece of news is that until now I haven’t had a set time to release these podcasts, unloading them sometime around Friday. I did a lot of research and came to no solid conclusions, so I’ve decided that for no good reason other than the feeling in my chest that I will release each edition on Monday morning. That goes counter to some of my thoughts on the matter, but in other ways it makes sense.

A silver lining to this change in schedule is that because the celebrity meltdown podcast is a two-parter and because I solidified another story in the last few days, I’ve got plenty of material to work with.

Look for the Clarence piece early Tuesday morning, and then every other piece on Monday mornings. And this time I mean it!

UPDATED: Did you hear about . . . ?

For those waiting for the next Field of Steve podcast, we have run into some difficulties here that I believe we can have fixed by late Sunday. I’ll keep you posted.

This week’s Field of Steve podcast asks the question why we care so much about celebrities involved in scandal and what it’s like to be standing where Congressman Anthony Weiner stood this week. The podcast will be out late on Saturday Sunday. To see what Weiner had dished at him, watch the ABC video.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVc0tB6AyxE&w=560&h=349]

The Soul of a City

We’ve all had the experience of going somewhere and either instantly loving it or hating it. Some places grow on you. That or you grow tired. It can be difficult to understand or explain why we feel the way we do.

Sometimes people are that way, too. We can meet someone and find it difficult to stay in the same room. A guy can be obnoxious, arrogant, friendly but condescending. And then we see that person being incredibly sensitive. Sometimes entire cities do the same thing.

That’s this week’s Field of Steve podcast.

This week’s podcast was sponsored by a listener who would like you to visit the blog COPD and Other Stuff. The site deals with COPD, which is Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The two main forms of those are emphysema and chronic asthmatic bronchitis. The other stuff on the blog includes Arthritis, Cellulites, Sarcoidosis, Sleep Apnea, RLS, Psoriasis and support groups and caregivers, and whatever else strikes the author’s fancy.

If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of the Field of Steve podcast, e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com.

The music comes from Kendra Springer from the album Hope and the single New Life. Both are available at Jamendo.com

If you have story ideas for the podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little “tip jar” button here can help. It will direct you to PayPal, where you can contribute using your own PayPal account or with a credit card.

Thanks for listening.

This place is mean

This week’s podcast will be a discussion about the personality of places.

As most of you know I live in the Seattle area. Seattle has a reputation for passive-aggressiveness and for shrugging its shoulders at its bad qualities. If you want a warm-up to the podcast, read a column from the Seattle Times’ Danny Westneat from 2009.

Closing case on Seattle’s culture.

The podcast will be posted early Saturday morning.

A voice from the alley

My grandparents' kids in later years, way post-Denver.

My uncles were young when they decided to enjoy a night out at a movie in downtown Denver. They heard yelling from an alley and were surprised when they discovered the source.

That’s this week’s Field of Steve Podcast.

This week the music comes from the performer David from the album Folk & Accoustic, which you can find on Jamendo.com.

If you have story ideas for the podcast, feel free to e-mail me at stvngrdnr@gmail.com.

If you don’t have story ideas, don’t feel any remorse. If you’re still not feeling good about that, or you just want to support this work, the little “tip jar” button here can help. It will direct you to PayPal, where you can contribute using your own PayPal account or with a credit card.

Thanks for listening.

The podcast: now on iTunes

Just got word yesterday that Field of Steve: the podcast, was approved for distribution on iTunes. This is probably sure to net me three or four more new listeners! At least my wife, with whom I celebrated my 15th wedding anniversary yesterday, will finally be able to listen.

As of yesterday, however, you wouldn’t be able to find it by searching on iTunes. That’s supposed to be available by Friday or so. For now I have an address to send you to in case you want to subscribe to the podcast over there. Click on the iTunes link above.

Every anniversary is worth the wait

1996


2011


Fifteen years ago today I was sitting, waiting for Diana to arrive to the Salt Lake City LDS temple, where we were scheduled to get married that day. I was a bit nervous, because in the past I had made plans to get married before, enough times that when my mother called my brother Jim and told him I was engaged he responded, “Again?”

Diana did arrive and we did get married that day and today we celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary, clearly marking the best 15 years of my life, or any life, if I can be so narrow minded.

The fidgetiness during those moments of waiting was well earned. A few years earlier I had made an appointment to get married at the same place, and later called to cancel it. The woman on the other end of the phone asked if I wanted to reschedule it. I wanted to say, “Yes,” but there was no reason to, and I sensed she was pained by my response. I may have been projecting.

I had been to a few weddings in LDS temples. In Salt Lake City, probably more than any other temple, it can be like a scene out of the movie “Cousins,” where one of the weddings takes place in a location called “Weddingland.” All morning long you see people following a different bride all over the grounds. To someone not of the LDS faith, who because of the church’s unusual position of only letting card-carrying members into the temple ceremonies, the scene must be especially dreamlike. There were 42 weddings at the Salt Lake City temple the day Diana and I got married, but to an onlooker must have looked like thousands.

Those moments for me, though, only came after that time of waiting before Diana arrived, as I wondered could this really be the “due time of the Lord.”

Another ritual Mormons undertake is one of a patriarchal blessing, in which a particular priesthood holder gives a blessing regarding the future. The language is often left to interpretation, but when my patriarch told me that one day I’d get married in the temple and he included “in the due time of the Lord,” I feared that meant it was going to take me a while. And indeed it did.

The reason was pretty simple. I wasn’t ready. I thought I was, several times, but I wasn’t. I needed to grow up. I’m a slow learner and adulthood took a while to set in.

Thank goodness. I wouldn’t be with Diana otherwise. She’s beautiful and brilliant. She’s patient.

She arrived that morning 15 years ago as eager as I was to get the ceremony going, though unaware she was a bit late and not especially tuned into what tardiness that day might mean to someone who had waited 13 years for that day to finally arrive.

As always, Diana was worth the wait.

Happy Anniversary Diana.

Here’s a post to a Salt Lake Tribune story about young LDS men taking their time getting married.